sheriff

4C Cleaner ep198

Many investigators are unaware of the extreme risks that are present when dealing with blood and bodily fluids. There are many bloodborne pathogens (BBP) infections that can be transmitted through contact with another person’s blood or bodily fluid that may contain blood including but not limited to, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV. Most exposures are caused by a lack of universal precautions on some level, whether they are the result of failure to use proper personal protective equipment (PPE) or are due to an unintentional sharp left in an inappropriate container for disposal.

Once you look at some crime scene bio-hazards statistics you will have a new respect of crime scene protection.  The caution here is; don’t let the day to day work desensitize you from the real dangers of blood and body fluids.

Some Statistics

1 out of every 24 people has Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C or HIV.

That’s a pretty sobering statistic, but very real. Here are the CDC stats to prove it:

1 in every 26 people has Hepatitis B.

  • Approximately 12 million Americans have been infected with Hepatitis B.
  • Over 1.4 million are chronically infected.
  • About 50% of the people in the United States with Hepatitis B are unaware of their infection.
  • Up to 100,000 new people will be infected each year.
  • Approximately 5,000 people will die each year from Hepatitis B and its’ complications.
  • Hepatitis B is 100 times more infectious than the AIDS virus.
  • The virus is transmitted through contact with the blood or other body fluids of an infected person.

 

1 in every 77 people has Hepatitis C.

  • Approximately 3.2 million people in the United States have Hepatitis C.
  • Over 75% of the people in the United States with Hepatitis C are unaware of their infection.
  • Hepatitis C is the most common bloodborne pathogen infection in the US.
  • Hepatitis C is the most common cause of death from liver disease.

 

1 out of every 258 people has HIV.

  • There are an estimated 1.1 million people living with HIV in the United States.
  • 1 out of 5 are unaware of their infection.
  • There are 50,000 new HIV diagnoses every year.
  • Every 9.5 minutes someone in the United States is infected with HIV.
  • Over 25% of people living with HIV or AIDS also has Hepatitis

Sources: Centers for Disease Control, WHO 


Episode Guest:


 

 

 

 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 


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ep 197 TYD Podcast


I this episode I share the conversation  I had on the podcast Tending Your Dreams. The host draws out background information not regularly shared on this show. We also talk about the development of the Academy and the book CODE. This is an interesting episode because it gives a good behind the scenes look at this show and the Academy.

Find the Tending Your Dreams Podcast on  Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast directory.

 

 

 

 

 

..

 

 

 

 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 


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ep196 Water Intoxication Death


Water intoxication, also known as water poisoning, hyperhydration, overhydration, or water toxemia is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain functions that results when the normal balance of electrolytes in the body is pushed outside safe limits by excessive water intake.

Under normal circumstances, accidentally consuming too much water is exceptionally rare. Nearly all deaths related to water intoxication in normal individuals have resulted either from water drinking contests, in which individuals attempt to consume large amounts of water or from long bouts of exercise during which excessive amounts of fluid were consumed. In addition, water cure, a method of torture in which the victim is forced to consume excessive amounts of water, can cause water intoxication.

Water, just like any other substance, can be considered a poison when over-consumed in a specific period of time. Water intoxication mostly occurs when water is being consumed in a high quantity without adequate electrolyte intake.

Pathophysiology

At the onset of this condition, fluid outside the cells has an excessively low amount of solutes, such as sodium and other electrolytes, in comparison to fluid inside the cells, causing the fluid to move into the cells to balance its concentration. This causes the cells to swell. In the brain, this swelling increases intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to the first observable symptoms of water intoxication:  headache, personality changes, changes in behavior, confusion, irritability, and drowsiness.

These are sometimes followed by difficulty breathing during exertion, muscle weakness & pain, twitching, or cramping, nausea, vomiting, thirst, and a dulled ability to perceive and interpret sensory information. As the condition persists, papillary and vital signs may result including bradycardia and widened pulse pressure. The cells in the brain may swell to the point where blood flow is interrupted resulting in cerebral edema. Swollen brain cells may also apply pressure to the brain stem causing central nervous system dysfunction. Both cerebral edema and interference with the central nervous system are dangerous and could result in seizures, brain damage, coma or death.


 Dr. Banerjee has been a practicing forensic pathologist for 6 years after training at the top programs such as The Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.  She is board certified in both Anatomic and Forensic Pathology by the American Board of Pathology. In addition, she brings a unique perspective with insight into medical conditions as she completed a year of internal medicine training at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

During her career, she has conducted over 1400 postmortem examinations including handling over 100 homicide cases. She also has been called to multiple crime scenes to provide immediate expertise.

In addition to postmortem examinations, she prides herself in academic endeavors. Dr. Banerjee is  a Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology at Brown University. She has also published multiple articles in peer-reviewed journals.

 


 

 


 

 

 

 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 


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ep195 Preventing Obstacles in Prosecution

Rules that Govern an Investigation

The purpose of an investigation is to obtain information that will provide clues for further inquiry,  establish facts on which to base probable cause and develop enough evidence to convict the perpetrator

All of these actions are governed by a number of rules that apply to all facets of the investigation. Those rules are commonly referred to as rules of evidence. If an investigator violates any of the rules of evidence during the investigation the evidence gathered may be declared inadmissible in court and therefore create an obstacle for the prosecution.

Using Deception

While there are times when it is permissible to use deception when performing an investigation, it is important to understand the limited times when deception is appropriate. Undercover operations employ deception when investigators pose as criminals to gain the confidence of suspects or suspect groups.

However, the use of deception has its limitations and does not include the actual evidence, reports, or other types of information submitted to be true and accurate.

If an investigator does any of the following it not only negates the value of the evidence but also may be the basis for the investigator to become the subject of a criminal investigation.

  • Creating evidence or planting evidence
  • Lying in court (testifying)
  • Lying in reports, notebooks, or other administrative or investigative reports
  • Lying in any administrative or civil proceedings

Searches

Investigators often must conduct searches to obtain physical evidence. Those searches must fall within the restrictions of the 4th amendment to be considered reasonable and the evidence obtained from the search to be admissible.

Searches for evidence fall into two primary categories.

1.) A search pursuant to a duly executed search warrant; and

2.) A warrantless search.

Searches Pursuant to a Warrant

Searches pursuant to a warrant are subject to challenge based on the credibility of the information used to apply for the warrant. Should that information be deceptive it could lead to the fruit of the search being declared inadmissible in a suppression hearing.

When a search warrant is challenged the defendant has the burden of proof to show the warrant to be defective. The defendant’s motion to suppress the evidence may be based on one of the following:

  1. The warrant was improper upon its face or illegally issued, including the issuance of a warrant without a proper showing of probable cause;
  2. That the property seized was not that described in the warrant and that the officer was not otherwise lawfully privileged to seize the same;
  3. That the warrant was illegally executed by the officer; and
  4. That in any other manner the search and seizure violated the rights of the person involved.

Warrantless Searches

A search without a warrant is presumed unreasonable and the evidence will be excluded unless it falls into one of the exceptions to the warrant requirement. There are some exceptions but it is recommended that, if possible, a search warrant should be obtained.

Warrantless searches may be considered permissible under exigent circumstances. The United States Supreme Court has outlined the exigent circumstances exception as follows:

A warrantless intrusion into a home may be justified by:

1.) Hot pursuit of a fleeing felon; or
2.) Imminent destruction of evidence; or
3.) The need to prevent a suspect’s escape; or
4.) The risk of danger to the police or to other persons inside or outside the dwelling.

** In absence of Hot Pursuit, there must be probable cause that one or more of the other factors were present.

** In assessing the risk of danger, the gravity of the crime and likelihood that the suspect is armed should be considered.

Consent Searches

There are times when an officer asks for and is granted permission to search. This is known as a consent search. When a consent search produces evidence the burden of proof falls upon the prosecution to show by a preponderance of the evidence that the consent was freely and voluntarily given under the totality of the circumstances

Consent searches face the following challenges:

  1. Was consent voluntarily given under totality of the circumstances?
  2. Did the scope of the search exceed the consent given?
  3. Did the person consenting have the authority or apparent authority to give the consent?

Interviewing Suspects and Witnesses

When questioning a suspect it is important to understand when the subject should be given the Miranda warning and when the suspect has a right to an attorney.

Miranda is a protection under the 5th amendment regarding self-incrimination. Miranda applies if:

  1. The person is in custody; and
  2. Being asked guilt seeking questions.

While this may seem pretty simple courts tend to view the circumstances from the suspect’s perspective. The argument then becomes a subjective issue. The courts consider whether the suspect felt he was in custody and not free to go.

The Miranda ruling was intended to eliminate the “inherently coercive” atmosphere that exists in a custodial environment. Therefore, the requirement for Miranda only exists when the suspect believes he/she is in custody.

Right to Counsel

The right to an attorney also applies to any person feeling they have become a subject of an investigation and are being asked guilt seeking questions. The 6th amendment protects the accused’s right to counsel in any criminal proceeding.

Two significant elements are “accused” and “criminal proceedings”.

When interviewing suspects, the violation of the 5th and 6th amendments could result in suppression of the evidence.

When a suspect requests a lawyer the investigator must terminate the interrogation. In State v Harris the court held that the defendant unambiguously asked for an attorney and therefore the information derived from subsequent questioning was inadmissible. This holding is compatible with the Fifth and Sixth Amendments guaranteeing the accused’s right to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.

The Sixth Amendment right to counsel has been extended to the following:

  1. The interrogation phase of a criminal investigation
  2. The trial itself · Sentencing
  3. At least an initial appeal of any conviction

When the Right to Counsel Attaches

Supreme Court case law indicates that the Sixth Amendment right to counsel attaches when judicial proceedings have begun against a suspect by means of preliminary hearing, indictment, information, arraignment, or formal charging. This includes any proceedings that take place subsequent to the charging of an individual. For purposes of an investigation, the charging process starts with the probable cause statement.

This, however, the absence of formal charges does not preclude the suspect’s right to an attorney prior to being charged. Both the Fifth and Sixth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution involve the right to counsel. While sometimes overlapping, there are several differences between these rights.

The Fifth Amendment right to counsel was recognized as part of Miranda v. Arizona and refers to the right to counsel during a custodial interrogation; the Sixth Amendment ensures the right to effective assistance of counsel during the critical stages of a criminal prosecution.

Therefore, prior to charging a suspect, the right to counsel still applies based on the principles set forth in the Miranda advisement. Under the Fifth Amendment, a person must be given Miranda warnings, including informing the suspect of their right to an attorney, before a custodial interrogation by a law enforcement officer. If an individual is not warned of his or her Miranda rights, any information gained through an interrogation is inadmissible in court. Miranda warnings were put in place to allow a suspect to consult with an attorney before a custodial interrogation, even though the suspect may not have been formally arrested.

Once a suspect invokes his/her right to counsel, an investigator may no longer ask guilt-seeking questions.


 


 

 

 

 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 


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ep194 Overview of Investigations


In our society, Public support is key in every aspect of policing from the needed appropriations to fund a department to the cooperation of individuals on the street. It is important to consider public perception when examining both the role and consequences of police in a democratic society. How the public views the police can determine the legitimacy of police authority and citizen compliance with the law.

Public perception has a tremendous impact on the success on an investigation in the interview process. Statements are more easily gotten when both the investigator and the agency present a positive and professional image.

We live in an era where law enforcement is coming under greater scrutiny as advances in technology has armed members of the public with the ability to video record and publish law enforcement contacts through a variety of social media outlets.

Sir Robert Peel said, “Police must secure the willing cooperation of the public in voluntary observance of the law to be able to secure and maintain the respect of the public.”

There are two major factors that influence the public’s perception of law enforcement. Those factors are:

  1. The investigator’s appearance
  2. The investigator’s behavior

Investigator Appearance

A well-groomed investigator can portray confidence, professionalism, and a command presence that helps to enlist the cooperation of those with whom the investigator must interview. Beards, long mustaches, offensive tattoos, morbid obesity and any other element of unprofessional appearance creates a negative image in conflict with the professional objective that the investigator is attempting to achieve.

To enlist public support, an investigator must first earn the public’s respect. An investigator’s presence sends a message and the degree of support that the investigator receives depends on whether the message is positive or negative.

The first level of force on the force continuum is often a police presence. A professional image that exudes confidence is an effective force and can be instrumental in maintaining control when interacting with members of the public.

Investigator Behavior

It is often said that investigators live in a glass house. It is certainly true that uniformed investigators draw the public’s attention and are often scrutinized more closely than the general public. The public holds investigators to a higher standard than that of other citizens and expects those investigators to be an example to the community. Any violation of the law will be noticed and likely reported.

Investigators who have a reputation for even minor violations begin to lose their effectiveness as an investigator once the habitual violations become known.

We are living in an era that encourages citizens to become more watchful of law enforcement and to report any violations. With today’s technology and the proliferation of cell phones with video capability, the report of such violations are often supported with video footage. Even the slightest indication of bias can have a negative effect on the professional image.

The Impact of Public Perception

In our society, Public support is key in every aspect of policing from the needed appropriations to fund a department to the cooperation of individuals on the street. It is important to consider public perception when examining both the role and consequences of police in a democratic society. How the public views the police can determine the legitimacy of police authority and citizen compliance with the law.

Public perception has a tremendous impact on the success on an investigation in the interview process. Statements are more easily gotten when both the investigator and the agency present a positive and professional image.

.


 

 

 

 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 


coroner,police training, darren dake,sheriff,deputy,coroner association,murder scenes,auto fatalities,csi,first responders,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,forensic science crime scene investigation,forensic science crime,scene investigator,forensic training,forensics training,how to be a crime scene investigator,how to become a death investigator,how to become a medical examiner,how to become a medical examiner investigator,medical examiner investigator training,medical investigator training,medicolegal death,medicolegal death investigator training,murder scenes,pictures of murder scenes,murder,real murder crime scenes,traffic deaths,traffic fatalities,what does it take to be a coroner,what does it take to be a criminal investigator,firefighter,fire training,firefighter training,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,coroner information,crime scene clean up training,crime scene cleaning training,crime scene cleanup training,crime scene investigation,crime scene investigation classes,crime scene investigator courses,crime scene investigator school,crime scene jobs,crime scene photography,crime scene photography training,crime scene technician,crime scene technician training,crime scene training,criminal investigation,criminal investigator,criminal justice,criminal justice forensic science,criminal justice forensics,criminal scene investigation,death crime scenes,death investigation training,death investigator training,death investigators,forensic death investigator,forensic investigator,forensic photography, crime scene clean up,crime scene bio-hazard, using plants in criminal investigation,forensic botany,dr.jane bock,death investigator magazine,dr judy melinek,badge of life,american college of forensic examiners,acfei,american board of medicolegal death investigators,abmdi,matthew lunn,underwater crime scene,mike berry,online learning,lopa,cultural diversity,anger de-escalation, coroner school, 

ep193 North to Alaska

Alaska Medical Examiner

The State Medical Examiner Office is responsible for conducting the medical/legal investigative work related to unanticipated, sudden or violent deaths. This includes determining cause and manner of death and providing consultation to law enforcement and the courts. The State Medical Examiner’s Office conducts autopsies, provides court testimony when necessary, and assists with the review of all child deaths through the Child Fatality Review Team.


Todays Guest

Summer Yancey

Experienced Investigator with a demonstrated history of working in the executive office industry. Skilled in Emergency Management, Death Investigation, Private Investigations, Confidential Document Management, Event Management, Team Building, and Public Speaking. Strong mental/behavioral health and medicolegal professional with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), focused in Criminal Justice/Psychology from the University of Alaska Anchorage.

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.

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Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 

 

 

 


 

ep192 I had to identify my husband’s head – a survivor’s story

A thousand questions littered my brain.  The three letter word everyone waited for was lodged in my throat.  My stomach wanted to heave.  My knees buckled.  Arms supported mine.  I was a marionette.  They waited patiently but no words came. The procedure was repeated.  I again faced the decomposing, torn mask of a face that used to smile at me, at a mouth that offered encouragement.  I finally blurted “Yes!”

In her own words

This arcane cavity was a vault, a cage, a bunker. I felt cooler and weaker with each footstep.  We stopped.  I tried not to breathe.  The pungent odor inside that chamber was a suffocating mix of used kitty litter, rotten eggs and unwashed Styrofoam meat tray from the market carelessly left out overnight.  Disinfectant did not neutralize the foulness of death, grief, or confusion.  He’d been submerged inside a desolate, warm, bog for a week before being exhumed.

 My eyes closed reflexively. Detective Landeros leaned in and quietly said: “When you’re ready.”

 I felt I’d never be ready.  How can a wife ever be prepared to gaze upon the bludgeoned, detached head of her spouse five feet away? Seconds passed like minutes. My eyes slowly opened whereupon I saw Al’s contorted face, supported by a white sheet wrapped tightly around his severed neck. His eyeglasses were missing.  His face was knotted, his eyes puffy and black, incongruent with his light gray skin. Wide lacerations crisscrossed his head like a network of roads. His mouth was open and round with a swollen tongue which protruded off to the right at an angle. A cavernous gash framed his badly swollen right eye where a section of scalp was missing.

It was horrific. He was badly defaced. What did he do to deserve this viciousness?  What kind of monster inflicted this destruction?

A thousand questions littered my brain.  The three letter word everyone waited for was lodged in my throat.  My stomach wanted to heave.  My knees buckled.  Arms supported mine.  I was a marionette.  They waited patiently but no words came. The procedure was repeated.  I again faced the decomposing, torn mask of a face that used to smile at me, at a mouth that offered encouragement.  I finally blurted “Yes!”

News Report:

On a summer day in July 1985, police made a grisly discovery in Northern Michigan: a satchel buried a mere couple of feet beneath the forest floor. A collection of garbage bags were inside, each one containing the severed limbs of a human body. The hands, feet, and head all belonged to Alan Canty—a local man who had disappeared the previous week. The rest of Canty’s blood-encrusted remains would be found days later, scattered across the state.

To his family and friends, Alan Canty was a married, successful psychologist from the affluent Grosse Pointe neighborhood. Behind closed doors, he was something else entirely: the “Sugar Daddy” to teenage sex worker Dawn Spens. Over the course of their two-year relationship, Canty showered her with gifts, shelling out thousands to support her and her pimp-boyfriend John Carl Fry—who was known as “Lucky.”

But even a man as wealthy as Alan Canty could not maintain such a lifestyle. When he revealed that his money had run out, Spens and Fry’s patience had run thin. Furious that Canty wanted to end the relationship, Fry attacked the psychologist with a baseball bat. The grisly mutilation that followed, all done with a serrated Ginsu knife, was also Fry’s handiwork.

John Carl Fry received a life sentence for his crimes. Spens, who was just 19 at the time of the murder, escaped with dismemberment charges and probation. Today, she walks free.  Partial Reprint from https://the-line-up.com/murder-and-dismemberment-in-the-motor-city 


Today’s Guest

Jan Canty, Ph.D. holds a Ph.D. in psychology. In 1985 her spouse was murdered and we were asked to identify his severed head in the morgue a week after he was exhumed. She has since written a yet-to-be-published book entitled Till Death We Did Part: Memoir of Deception, Murder, and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 

 

 

 


 

 

coroner,police training, darren dake,sheriff,deputy,coroner association,murder scenes,auto fatalities,csi,first responders,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,forensic science crime scene investigation,forensic science crime,scene investigator,forensic training,forensics training,how to be a crime scene investigator,how to become a death investigator,how to become a medical examiner,how to become a medical examiner investigator,medical examiner investigator training,medical investigator training,medicolegal death,medicolegal death investigator training,murder scenes,pictures of murder scenes,murder,real murder crime scenes,traffic deaths,traffic fatalities,what does it take to be a coroner,what does it take to be a criminal investigator,firefighter,fire training,firefighter training,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,coroner information,crime scene clean up training,crime scene cleaning training,crime scene cleanup training,crime scene investigation,crime scene investigation classes,crime scene investigator courses,crime scene investigator school,crime scene jobs,crime scene photography,crime scene photography training,crime scene technician,crime scene technician training,crime scene training,criminal investigation,criminal investigator,criminal justice,criminal justice forensic science,criminal justice forensics,criminal scene investigation,death crime scenes,death investigation training,death investigator training,death investigators,forensic death investigator,forensic investigator,forensic photography, crime scene clean up,crime scene bio-hazard, using plants in criminal investigation,forensic botany,dr.jane bock,death investigator magazine,dr judy melinek,badge of life,american college of forensic examiners,acfei,american board of medicolegal death investigators,abmdi,matthew lunn,underwater crime scene,mike berry,online learning,lopa,cultural diversity,anger de-escalation

 

ep191 From Surgical Tech to MDI


In this episode, I talk with Malory, a new Medicolegal Death Investigator. Malory knew she wanted to be a Coroner Investigator at 16 years old. Her career path took her down the Surgical Technologist route but the investigation dream still smoldered inside.  Then, 20 years later, she was able to see her dream realized.  I talk with Malory about what lead her to this career choice and how she was able to find the education needed to pursue it.


 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 

 

 

 


 

 

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ep190 [pt2] Written Statements-Investigative Psychological Approach


Handwriting is more than a personality-type indicator. Handwriting is brain writing; the communication transaction concludes with a tangible time-stamped view of a person’s inner thoughts and emotions

Twenty Reasons why to use handwriting as a supplement to pre-employment screens, interviewing for internal positions, forensic interviews, recruiting screens, and investigations.

  1. Dr. Doscher’s method …is noninvasive
  2. …is a screening tool for truthful and deceptive statements.
  3. …recognizes and differentiates truth and deception from the truth and cognitive load.
  4. …is not a subjective analysis based on correlations.
  5. …is an individualized, measurable analysis, specific to the person writing the statement.
  6. …is an analytical screening method.
  7. …is brain activity on paper.
  8. …is not language specific; it has been tested in 5 languages!
  9. …addresses the unpredictable nature of human behavior.
  10. …presents a time-stamped, tangible representation of a person’s cognitive responses.
  11. …indirectly measure of neuro-psychological responses.
  12. …is applied before initial interviews/interrogations.
  13. …statements may be written on lined or unlined paper, with a pen or a pencil.
  14. …statements may be written in cursive or print.
  15. …baselines are obtained simultaneously with the written statement.
  16. … is not tolerant to manipulative behaviors, found in sex offenders and repeat criminals.
  17. …results are not race or gender dependent.
  18. …results are based on intra-subject ratios.
  19. …samples are not compared or based on other subjects’ behaviors.
  20. …results are presented as court-ready documents.

Full description and explanation during the full audio podcast


Episode Quest

Michelle Doscher, PhD has 25+ years combined experience in various areas of investigative work, encompassing chemical analyses, crime scene investigations, expert testimony, research and development, forensic interviewing, and instruction/training.


 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 

 

 

 


 

 

coroner,police training, darren dake,sheriff,deputy,coroner association,murder scenes,auto fatalities,csi,first responders,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,forensic science crime scene investigation,forensic science crime,scene investigator,forensic training,forensics training,how to be a crime scene investigator,how to become a death investigator,how to become a medical examiner,how to become a medical examiner investigator,medical examiner investigator training,medical investigator training,medicolegal death,medicolegal death investigator training,murder scenes,pictures of murder scenes,murder,real murder crime scenes,traffic deaths,traffic fatalities,what does it take to be a coroner,what does it take to be a criminal investigator,firefighter,fire training,firefighter training,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,coroner information,crime scene clean up training,crime scene cleaning training,crime scene cleanup training,crime scene investigation,crime scene investigation classes,crime scene investigator courses,crime scene investigator school,crime scene jobs,crime scene photography,crime scene photography training,crime scene technician,crime scene technician training,crime scene training,criminal investigation,criminal investigator,criminal justice,criminal justice forensic science,criminal justice forensics,criminal scene investigation,death crime scenes,death investigation training,death investigator training,death investigators,forensic death investigator,forensic investigator,forensic photography, crime scene clean up,crime scene bio-hazard, using plants in criminal investigation,forensic botany,dr.jane bock,death investigator magazine,dr judy melinek,badge of life,american college of forensic examiners,acfei,american board of medicolegal death investigators,abmdi,matthew lunn,underwater crime scene,mike berry,online learning,lopa,cultural diversity,anger de-escalation

ep189 [pt1} Written Statements-Investigative Psychological Approach


Handwriting is more than a personality-type indicator. Handwriting is brain writing; the communication transaction concludes with a tangible time-stamped view of a person’s inner thoughts and emotions

Twenty Reasons why to use handwriting as a supplement to pre-employment screens, interviewing for internal positions, forensic interviews, recruiting screens, and investigations.

  1. Dr. Doscher’s method …is noninvasive
  2. …is a screening tool for truthful and deceptive statements.
  3. …recognizes and differentiates truth and deception from the truth and cognitive load.
  4. …is not a subjective analysis based on correlations.
  5. …is an individualized, measurable analysis, specific to the person writing the statement.
  6. …is an analytical screening method.
  7. …is brain activity on paper.
  8. …is not language specific; it has been tested in 5 languages!
  9. …addresses the unpredictable nature of human behavior.
  10. …presents a time-stamped, tangible representation of a person’s cognitive responses.
  11. …indirectly measure of neuro-psychological responses.
  12. …is applied before initial interviews/interrogations.
  13. …statements may be written on lined or unlined paper, with a pen or a pencil.
  14. …statements may be written in cursive or print.
  15. …baselines are obtained simultaneously with the written statement.
  16. … is not tolerant to manipulative behaviors, found in sex offenders and repeat criminals.
  17. …results are not race or gender dependent.
  18. …results are based on intra-subject ratios.
  19. …samples are not compared or based on other subjects’ behaviors.
  20. …results are presented as court-ready documents.

Full description and explanation during the full audio podcast


Episode Quest

Michelle Doscher, PhD has 25+ years combined experience in various areas of investigative work, encompassing chemical analyses, crime scene investigations, expert testimony, research and development, forensic interviewing, and instruction/training.


 

Death Investigator Magazine

A digital magazine focused on the death investigation community. Dedicated to improving skills and enriching lives of investigators.

“To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we only owe the truth.”
Voltaire

.

 


 

Medicolegal Death Investigation – Online Academy 

Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, Police, and Forensic students. This hybrid course looks at death investigation from a combined perspective of law enforcement and medicolegal death investigations.

MLDI online Academy is a Nationally Accredited online training designed to teach all aspects of death investigation and scene management. Unlike any other coroner training today,  this course offers a blended learning style combining online self-paced video training, along with opportunities for live interaction with instructors several times throughout the program, and a unique private Facebook group open only to students of Coroner School™ where everyone can interact and ask questions.

MLDI online Academy is a six-week guided course with certified instructors. However, at the end of the six weeks, you still have access to all videos, downloadable material, and the private Facebook group. You can return to the online school anytime to finish up the courses or as a refresher in certain topic areas.


 

 

Medicolegal Death Investigation Scene Kit

This exclusive first of its kind Medicolegal Death Investigation (MLDI) kit contains all the items you need to document and collect evidence from the most important piece of evidence at any death scene – The Body. Designed for Coroners, Medical Examiner Investigators, and anyone responsible to investigate and process a death.

This kit is equipped to collect fragile evidence such as DNA and fibers, take post-mortem temperatures, document the scene through photography and sketching, as well as properly collect transport, and store material evidence.

This MLDI Kit can be used in large agencies for multiple MDI’s or one single kit for smaller agencies. Packaged in a sturdy Pelican carry case with custom dividers and a pocketed pouch system. Built strong to withstand the demands from scene to scene.

Click HERE for more information

 


 

 

The Death Investigation Training Academy was founded to play an integral role in the death investigation community.  The need for quality accredited training is in short supply and high demand. Using a combination of classroom training, live on site scenario exercises,  and web-based training, the Death Investigation Training Academy is filling the need of 21st-century investigators.

 

 

 

 


 

 

coroner,police training, darren dake,sheriff,deputy,coroner association,murder scenes,auto fatalities,csi,first responders,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,forensic science crime scene investigation,forensic science crime,scene investigator,forensic training,forensics training,how to be a crime scene investigator,how to become a death investigator,how to become a medical examiner,how to become a medical examiner investigator,medical examiner investigator training,medical investigator training,medicolegal death,medicolegal death investigator training,murder scenes,pictures of murder scenes,murder,real murder crime scenes,traffic deaths,traffic fatalities,what does it take to be a coroner,what does it take to be a criminal investigator,firefighter,fire training,firefighter training,autoerotic fatalities,become a coroner,coroner information,crime scene clean up training,crime scene cleaning training,crime scene cleanup training,crime scene investigation,crime scene investigation classes,crime scene investigator courses,crime scene investigator school,crime scene jobs,crime scene photography,crime scene photography training,crime scene technician,crime scene technician training,crime scene training,criminal investigation,criminal investigator,criminal justice,criminal justice forensic science,criminal justice forensics,criminal scene investigation,death crime scenes,death investigation training,death investigator training,death investigators,forensic death investigator,forensic investigator,forensic photography, crime scene clean up,crime scene bio-hazard, using plants in criminal investigation,forensic botany,dr.jane bock,death investigator magazine,dr judy melinek,badge of life,american college of forensic examiners,acfei,american board of medicolegal death investigators,abmdi,matthew lunn,underwater crime scene,mike berry,online learning,lopa,cultural diversity,anger de-escalation